What is Eventviewer in Windows and why is it important?

what-is-eventviewer-in-windows-and-why-is-it-important

If you’ve ever experienced a system crash or encountered an error message on your Windows computer, you may have turned to the Event viewer for information on what went wrong. The Event viewer is a tool that’s built into Windows that allows you to view detailed information about events that have taken place on your computer. In this blog post, we’ll take a look at what the Event viewer is and how you can use it to troubleshoot problems on your Windows computer.

What is Eventviewer?

Event Viewer is a tool that administrators can use to view important system events. These include when an application crashes, when a service starts up, and when an error occurs in a Windows component. By default, Event Viewer will log events from the past seven days. However, you can adjust this time period to see events from longer ago if needed.

Why is Eventviewer so important?

Many people think of Event Viewer as a purely diagnostic tool but it can be so much more than that. With a little bit of setup, Event Viewer can become an invaluable part of your organization’s security arsenal.

Tracking failed login attempts.

One of the most important uses for Event Viewer is tracking failed login attempts. By monitoring this data, you can quickly identify brute force attacks and take steps to protect your system. To do this, open Event Viewer and go to Windows Logs -> Security. Here you’ll find all the failed login attempts logged by Event Viewer. You can then use this data to track which IP addresses are attempting to brute force their way into your system and block them accordingly.

Misbehaving applications

Another great use for Event Viewer is identifying applications that are misbehaving. If an application keeps crashing or generating errors, you’ll be able to see that in Event Viewer. This can be extremely helpful when trying to troubleshoot problems with software. To view application logs, open Event Viewer and go to Windows Logs -> Application.

Monitoring performance

Finally, Eventviewer can also be used to monitor the performance of your system. This is especially useful if you’re trying to diagnose slowdowns or CPU spikes. To do this, open Event Viewer and go to Windows Logs -> System. Here you’ll find information about various aspects of your system’s performance like processor utilization and memory usage.

How to use Eventviewer in Windows?

The Event viewer tool can be found in the Control Panel of your Windows computer. To open it, just head to Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Event Viewer. Once you’re in the Event viewer, you’ll see a list of different event logs that you can choose from. The most useful ones for troubleshooting purposes are the Application, System, and Security logs.

The Application log contains information about events that have taken place in applications installed on your computer. For example, if an application crashes or if an error occurs when you try to open it, this information will be logged in the Application log. The System log contains information about events that have taken place in Windows itself. This can include information about when your computer starts up or shuts down, as well as errors that occur during these processes. The Security log contains information about events related to security on your computer, such as when a user logs in or out or attempts to access certain files or folders.

To view the details of a particular event, just double-click on it. This will open a window that displays more information about the event, including its date and time, its source, its category, and its ID number. This information can be helpful in determining what caused an event to occur and how to fix it.

What are some of the most common event viewer errors?

  1. The first error is “The event log file is corrupt.” This usually means that the event viewer has detected a problem with the way events are being logged on your computer. To fix this, you can try running the “Event Viewer Troubleshooter” tool from Microsoft.
  2. Another common error is “The application was unable to start correctly (0xc0000142).” This typically indicates that there is a problem with the way an application is configured. To fix this, you can try uninstalling and then reinstalling the affected application.
  3. Another common error is “The description for Event ID xxxx cannot be found in the event log or custom view.” This usually means that there is a problem with the way events are being logged on your computer. To fix this, you can try running the “Event Viewer Troubleshooter” tool from Microsoft.
  4. Another common error is “TheEventLogsProviderWmi::Get-OWC10EventLogs threw an exception.” This usually indicates that there is a problem with Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI). To fix this, you can try restarting the WMI service by running the following commands in an elevated Command Prompt:  cd %windir%\system32\wbem net stop winmgmt winmgmt /verifyrepository (If this command returns WBEM_E_REPOSITORY_NOT_FOUND, then run winmgmt /salvagerepository) net start winmgmt  5.
  5. And finally, another common error is “The COM+ Event System failed to fire notification events for Consumer Applications.” This typically means that there is a problem with COM+. To fix this, you can try restarting the COM+ System Application service by running the following commands in an elevated Command Prompt: sc stop comsysapp
  6. sc start comsysapp
  7. If you’re still seeing errors after trying these solutions, then it’s time to contact a professional for assistance.

Conclusion

Event Viewer can be a helpful tool when trying to troubleshoot problems on your computer. However, it’s important to keep in mind that not every error message indicates a serious issue. In fact, some of the most common event viewer errors are actually pretty harmless. So, next time you see an error message pop up in Event Viewer, don’t panic! Just refer back to this article to figure out what it means.

Author:
I am a computer engineer holding a bachelor's degree in Computer Science, complemented by a Master's in Business Administration from University of Strathclyde, Scotland. I currently work as a Senior IT Consultant in Melbourne, Australia. With over 15 years of...