10 Reasons Why You Should Use A Password Manager

10-reasons-why-you-should-use-a-password-manager

Are you one of those people who use the same password for all your accounts? Do you store your passwords in an easily accessible place, like a notebook or your email account? If so, you’re putting yourself at risk for identity theft. A password manager is a software program that can help protect you from cybercrime by creating and storing complex passwords for all of your online accounts. Here are 10 reasons why you should start using a password manager today.

1. You’re using the same password for all your accounts.

If you’re using the same password for all your online accounts, a hacker only needs to crack that one password to gain access to all of your information. A password manager creates unique, complex passwords for each of your accounts so that even if one is compromised, the others remain safe.

2. You’re storing your passwords in an easily accessible place.

If you’re keeping your passwords in a notebook or in an unencrypted file on your computer, anyone who finds it can access your accounts. A password manager stores your passwords in an encrypted format so that only you can unlock them.

3. You’re using easily guessed passwords.

If your password is something like “password” or “123456,” it’s not going to take a sophisticated hacker long to crack it. A password manager can generate complex passwords that are much harder to guess.

4. You’re not changing your passwords regularly.

If you’re not changing your passwords on a regular basis, you’re giving hackers more time to try to crack them. A password manager can help you keep track of when to change your passwords and can even generate new passwords for you.

5. You’re reusing old passwords.

If you’ve ever used a password that you’ve used before, a hacker may be able to use that information to access your accounts. A password manager can generate new, unique passwords for each of your accounts so that you never have to reuse an old password again.

6. You’re using easily guessed security questions.

If you’re using easily guessed security questions, like your mother’s maiden name or your pet’s name, a hacker can easily reset your password and gain access to your account. A password manager can generate random answers to security questions so that even if a hacker knows the answer to your security question, they can’t access your account.

7. You’re not using Two-Factor Authentication.

If you’re not using Two-Factor Authentication (also known as Two-Step Verification), you’re making it easier for hackers to gain access to your accounts. Two-Factor Authentication adds an extra layer of security by requiring you to enter a code from your phone in addition to your password. A password manager can help you set up Two-Factor Authentication for all of your accounts.

8. You’re sharing your passwords with others.

If you’re sharing your passwords with family or friends, you’re increasing the chances that they will be compromised. A password manager can generate unique passwords for each person so that you can share them without worrying about them being stolen.

9. You’re using public Wi-Fi without a VPN.

If you’re using public Wi-Fi without a Virtual Private Network (VPN), you’re making it easy for hackers to intercept the data you’re sending and receive. A VPN encrypts your data so that even if a hacker is able to intercept it, they won’t be able to read it. A password manager can help you set up a VPN so that you can use public Wi-Fi without worry.

10. You’re not backing up your passwords.

If you’re not backing up your passwords, you’re at risk of losing them if your computer crashes or if you forget them. A password manager can help you back up your passwords so that you can always have access to them.

Conclusion

A password manager is a great way to keep your passwords safe and secure. Not only does it create unique, complex passwords for each of your accounts, but it also helps you keep track of when to change your passwords and can even generate new passwords for you. If you’re not using a password manager, now is the time to start!

If you find it all too tedious, get in touch with a computer technician.

Author:
I am a computer engineer holding a bachelor's degree in Computer Science, complemented by a Master's in Business Administration from University of Strathclyde, Scotland. I currently work as a Senior IT Consultant in Melbourne, Australia. With over 15 years of...